​THE ANNOYING DATE-ERROR MENTIONED TWICE  IN THE BATTLE OF MARATHON EPISODE OF BATTLES BC, I CAN’T TAKE IT ANYMORE, SO HERE IS A POST THAT IS NOT ABOUT PHOTOGRAPHY 

INTRODUCTION 

I think that BATTLES BC was a great show, with fairly decent, pretty vicious, and acceptable graphic battle scenes.  The show also hosted knowledgeable and entertaining Historians, and I couldn’t believe the show was canceled after only one season—a typical and horrible TV programming decision.

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THE DREADED DATE-ERROR

Nevertheless, as much as I enjoy watching the BATTLE OF MARATHON episode, I have always had an annoying feeling about a particular “date-error” in this episode.  I have never publicly mentioned my annoyance in any YouTube comments, or anywhere else…but I just can’t hold back any longer, as any young history student could be misinformed if they take what is said in the show, as totally correct information.  

Of course, the winners usually write the majority of the History tomes, which can lead to some predisposed bias of “the what”, “the how much”, “the how many”, and “the why” of historical events.  BUT USUALLY, Historians can typically agree upon the general, or exact, dates of historical records because of first-hand sources whose writings still exist (for example, the histories of Xenophon—he took part in some of the historical events he wrote about—The Anabasis is his story of the march to Persia to aid Cyrus, a march for which he played a major role and documented the journey, which occurred between 401BC and March 399 BC).  In addition to first-hand sources, there are also ancient relics which can be carbon dated to help determine specific periods/relative dates of particular events, civilizations, and disasters.

THE 40 YEARS MISTAKE

I had to watch a couple of the parts of the Battle of Marathon episode, many times, because I couldn’t believe the date-error I believed I was hearing.  The writers made one huge mistake at 41:03, the narrator said: “Forty years after the catastrophe he (Xerxes) journeyed to Greece to avenge his (Xerxes’s) father’s (Darius’s) defeat”, and I’m assuming the narrator means the catastrophe of Marathon (490BC).  And then, at 41:14, Professor Richard A. Gabriel, said, “The desire for revenge against Athens, 40 years later, sets up one of the signature battles in Western military History, the last stand of the 300 at the pass of Thermopylae.”  I do have a hearing impairment, but I’m pretty sure I’m hearing this properly, and that in both places, the narrator and the Historian both said “40 years” [“after” and “later”].  

OK WAIT A MINUTE, MAYBE I JUST HEARD EVERYTHING IN REVERSE:  COULD THE SHOW BE REFERRING TO A PERSIAN BATTLE CATASTROPHE IN 530BC—WAS I CONFUSED AND DID THEY REALLY SAY “BEFORE” AND “PRIOR TO” THE BATTLE OF MARATHON?

No—I’m just mess’en with ya!

I do not believe that when the narrator refers to the “Catastrophe”, that he is referring to another, prior-to-Marathon, military disaster of Persia, for example, a battle that could have taken place in the year 530BC, which is 40 years before the Battle of Marathon (490BC).  

The Persians were pretty successful until Marathon, with a few exceptions, such as the Sacking of Sardis(498BC), eight years before Marathon: Eretria, and their allie, Athens, were responsible for the burning of Sardis, and further infuriating King Darius.  Whatever the case may be, I do not believe the Battles BC writers are referring to any Persian military disaster before Marathon.

PLUS, THEY REALLY SAID “40 YEARS AFTER” AND “40 YEARS LATER”

■  They REALLY did say “40 year after” and “40 years later”—I double-quadruple checked the video.  Thus, 40 years after or later would be the year 450BC—40 years AFTER the Battle of Marathon (490BC)! So what really happened in 450BC?

I WAS SHOCKED!

■ When it was mentioned that the Battle at Thermopylae occurred 40 years later, after the “Catastrophe” of the Battle of Marathon, I was shocked:  The Battle of Marathon occurred in 490BC, and the Battle at Thermopylae occurred in 480BC (8 – 10 Sept, 480BC, Greswell, p. 374), and NOT 450BC, as the narrator and Historian quite clearly alluded to in the programme (in two different places).  Nothing of real significance even happened between Greece/Athens and the Persian Empire, 40 years later, in 450BC.  However, in 454BC, an end came to the six years war, or revolt, of the Egyptians against the Persians, in which the Athenians gave aid and took part in the war, but only to be defeated in the end.  

THE PERSIAN’S BIGGEST CATASTROPHE 

It may be most correct to say that the Persian’s greatest “Catastrophe” was handed to them by the Greeks, in 478BC (Wikipedia says 479BC—August 479 BC), when the Greeks annihilated the Persians at the Battle of Plataea

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Here are the Stats for the Battle of Plataea!

Casualties and losses

The Greeks

10,000+ (Ephorus and Diodorus)

1,360 (Plutarch)

159 (Herodotus)

The Persians 

257,000 (Herodotus)

100,000 (Diodorus)

50,000-90,000 (modern consensus)

■  The Greeks dished out a serious Smack-Down Ass-Kick’en!

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From a Historian’s point of view, the incorrect number of years mentioned separating Marathon and Thermopylae of “40 years later”, should seem like a very glaring mistake.

DISAPPOINTED
 

I have always been a little disappointed that the editors did not thoroughly look into this date-error before filming.  And, I’m more surprised that Professor Gabriel did not spot this error, but took part in propagating the error by not correcting the writers, or himself, while filming the BATTLES BC show.

THE MAIN POINT OF THIS POST

I think the main point of this post is to demonstrate how important it is to do your own research and not believe everything you hear/see in an educational TV show, or, on the Internet.  Even though there is a lot of evidence to prove that powerful NW0 groups do intentionally change history through “corrupted” History textbooks, mainstream media FAKE NEWS, and other such efforts, to match their globalist agenda, that is not what I think was done in this episode of BATTLES BC—I think it was probably a research/writing/editing error, which was not discovered and thus, ended up in the show, much to my chagrin.

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The following is a list of the major battles after Marathon, as documented by Sir Edward Creasy.

“B.C. 490 to 487. All Asia is filled with the preparations made by King Darius for a new expedition against Greece. Themistocles persuades the Athenians to leave off dividing the proceeds of their silver mines among themselves, and to employ the money in strengthening their navy.

487. Egypt revolts from the Persians, and delays the expedition against Greece.

485. Darius dies, and Xerxes his son becomes King of Persia in his stead.

484 The Persians recover Egypt.

■  480 Xerxes invades Greece. Indecisive actions between the Persian and Greek fleets at Artemisium. Destruction of the three hundred Spartans at Thermopyae. The Athenians abandon Attica and go on shipboard. Great naval victory of the Greeks at Salamis. Xerxes returns to Asia, leaving a chosen army under Mardonius, to carry on the war against the Greeks.

478. Mardonius and his army destroyed by the Greeks at Plataea The Greeks land in Asia Minor, and defeat a Persian force at Mycale. In this and the following years the Persians lose all their conquests in Europe, and many on the coast of Asia.

477. Many of the Greek maritime states take Athens as their leader, instead of Sparta.

466. Victories of Cimon over the Persians at the Eurymedon.

464. Revolt of the Helots against Sparta. Third Messenian war.

460. Egypt again revolts against Persia. The Athenians send a powerful armament to aid the Egyptians, which, after gaining some successes, is destroyed, and Egypt submits. This war lasted six years.

457. Wars in Greece between the Athenian and several Peloponnesian states.  At the period we now advert to (B.C. 457), an Athenian armament of two hundred galleys was engaged in a bold though unsuccessful expedition against Egypt.  

455. A thirty years’ truce concluded between Athens and Lacedaemon.

440. The Samians endeavour to throw off the supremacy of Athens. Samos completely reduced to subjection. Pericles is now sole director of the Athenian councils.

431. Commencement of the great Peloponnesian war, in which Sparta, at the head of nearly all the Peloponnesian states, and aided by the Boeotians and some of the other Greeks beyond the Isthmus, endeavours to reduce the power of Athens, and to restore independence to the Greek maritime states who were the subject allies of Athens.”

(Source:  THE FIFTEEN DECISIVE BATTLES OF THE WORLD FROM MARATHON TO WATERLOO , By Sir Edward Creasy, M.A., 1851)

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