abstract

Tie Painting v.5-B

Tie Painting v.5-B, originally uploaded by fine-grain.

Painted Tie Painting.
Still Life Photography.
Abstract Expressionism Painting.
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This is a photograph that “ties” (no pun intended) together my liking for Still Life Photography and Abstract Expressionism Painting. This photograph is also one of the few, first images I’ve edited with Paint Shop Pro’s new program, X2.

I may be an anomaly in the general scope of photography, but I really do prefer Paint Shop Pro over Photo Shop.

The key, however, is still to create the best photograph possible in the camera. If the end results of the “camera-creation” are poor; then the end results after editing with software will be nowhere near what they could have been.

I fiddle around a lot with positioning lighting and moving subject and tripod around. I take many photos until I get approximately the image that I need with dark blacks and details still in the highlights; and also, I attempt to get a fairly decent gradation between the extremes. If I have to take my soft-box’ed studio flash off the light stand, and then hand hold it to get my ideal lighting, then I’ll do it. In fact, that’s what I had to do with this image: the lighting was too uneven when the light was sitting on the light stand.

Whatever it takes – do it.

Of course, this final result was a matter of experimentation, of adventure and creating change. And of course, help from X2.

Sometimes, I don’t really know what the final image will look like until I see it. You often hear photographers saying that they have an image in their mind and then work on the photograph to get it to nearly match their mind’s eye. I do that sometimes; however, more times than not (lately), I’m not sure what the final image is going to look like. I work with the image until I have that, “Ah Ha!” moment.

Then, I stop.

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Ball-Splash-IMG_1922

Ball-Splash-IMG_1922, originally uploaded by fine-grain.

In photography, the smallest thing can be a great subject. The little, human detail can become a Leitmotiv (recurring phrase or theme in a work of art).” Henri Cartier-Bresson

This shot combines Physics (waves, collisions), Art (form, color, design), and Photography (High-Speed, Stop Action, Macro). This is a prime example of Action & Reaction, Cause & Effect. The Waves in this image are, I suspect, the “recurring phrase” that holds the water droplet image together, and links it to my other water droplet images.

NWD

NWD, originally uploaded by fine-grain.

Layers of Abstraction to make a single image: It is not really layers at all. A riddle or reality?

Abstract Photography or an Abstract Mind!

Updated Post: 4 March 2009:  Well, if I can’t find a way to change the url for this post, then I guess it will remain as is, but the topic of this post has drastically changed.

Yes, these are my Abstract Photographs.  And yes, if anyone has the desire to contact me for a purchase, I am very happy to discuss details:  Please send me a note.

Nevertheless, I once heard a photographer advise, “don’t do abstracts because no one loves them but the artist.” 

Is this true?  I don’t think so, but it may just take like-minded people to enjoy particular types of abstract work.

I could say the same thing about people photography:  I see an overabundance of really horribly (technically and interest-wise) designed people photographs, but I don’t go around telling people “don’t take photographs of people because no one will love them but the artist.” 

Perhaps it is just important to have an “abstract mind” to appreciate abstract work?  Could be…

These are abstract times…maybe people will start loving my work.

Just a few abstract thoughts for this update…

Seeing Differently

Grass in the Rain, by Nawfal Nur, 2007, All Rights Reserved.

  “Grass in a Rainstorm”
© 2007 Nawfal Nur
All Rights Reserved

Much about being a creative photographer is the ability to see things differently.


 

Maybe you are seeing the same thing, the same object, or the same landscape that thousands of other photographers have seen and photographed before; but are you seeing it differently through your viewfinder? Or, is it just another re-creation of what has been done a hundred, or a thousand times before?

 

With digital photography technology so viral and widespread, almost everyone has access to photography through one type of device or another. That doesn’t mean, however, that everyone knows how to take a photograph worth its electrons!

 

Reality offers us such wealth that we must cut some of it out on the spot, simplify. The question is, do we always cut out what we should? While we’re working, we must be conscious of what we’re doing. Sometimes we have the feeling that we’ve taken a great photo, and yet we continue to unfold. We must avoid however, snapping away, shooting quickly and without thought, overloading ourselves with unnecessary images that clutter our memory and diminish the clarity of the whole.” -Henri Cartier-Bresson, on photojournalism, American Photo, September/October 1997 , page: 76

 

Three cheers for H. Cartier-Bresson! Avoid being a “snapper” if you want to become a great photographer.

 

Like any other professional pursuit, great photographs are created by Photographers who think carefully before pulling the trigger, so to speak. Forget that digital is cheap and that you are not spending cold hard cash on film and development any more. Forget that your newfangled digital camera can set everything for you so that maybe you’ll get lucky with an interesting photo once in a while.  Photographic-Economizing and Luck just don’t quite cut it!

In my humble opinion, great photographs come from photographers with great eyes for a scene, purposeful compositions, good timing, fantastic sense-of-place, and superb technical know-how of their craft.

Seeing Differently is what can set you apart from the thousands of other photographers who take photographs of similar subject matter. It’s easy to blend in: It’s challenging and rewarding to set yourself apart and be different.

Clear the Stone of Leaves…

Dried Leaves on Stone, Edit B

 

Title: “Dried Leaves on Stone, Edit B”

Creation Date: 9 March 2007

Original Color Image Shot in 2006

 

Dried Leaves on Stone, Edit B,” is a very high contrast Black & White digital image, inspired by the opening lyrics of SLIPKNOT’s song, “Wait and Bleed“:

 

I’ve felt the hate rise up in me…
Kneel down and clear the stone of leaves…
I wander out where you can’t see…
Inside my shell, I wait and bleed…

 

The EXtreme contrast of this image and the imagery itself reminded me of the opening of this song by Slipknot: They may not be everyone’s cup-of-tea, but hell, I like’em. They are a bit angry, a bit EXtreme and probably the best band to ever come out of Iowa. I hate disco and electro-noise and this is the antithesis of all of that. EXtreme Black & White for EXtreme words.

“The inspiration behind a lot of my work comes from wanting to express something within myself and usually associated with the things I love (or dislike) about life or have experienced. Some are metaphor, others more obvious. Music is big influence and of course emotion plays it’s part.” – Leith O’Malley – Artist

 

You Can Now Purchase Prints of My Collection, "The Heavy Machines."

This Post Updated on 3 July 2008:

I am no longer selling at ART.com!!!

HOWEVER, if you like these photographs, you can contact me personally to order prints, or, I will give you a location (on the web) where you can place a convenient order.  I can also make personal prints (up to A4 size) and sign them for you (if you wish), and send them directly to you.  Just send me a note with your request.

THANK YOU!!!

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As you can see, there are many framing and matting options, or, you can just purchase the prints. Also, because of the array of colors in the images, my photographs really stand out and blend well with many wall colors. So, if you are shopping for new wall-art, please have a look at my new photography collection. Thank you!