Architecture Photography

IRITIS ARCHITECTURE SERIES, THE IRITIS COLLECTION

IRITIS ARCHITECTURE SERIES, THE IRITIS COLLECTION by Nawfal Johnson Nur:

Title:  IRITIS ARCHITECTURE, NO.1, EDIT D, Var.1. Series:  Iritis Architecture. Series History:  October 2013. Photographs in Series:  Six. Series Number in Collection:  Nine. Collection:  THE IRITIS COLLECTION. Collection History:  Sept to Nov 2013. Copyright 2013 Nawfal Johnson Nur ~ All Rights Reserved. Penang, Malaysia.

Title: IRITIS ARCHITECTURE, NO.1, EDIT D, Var.1.
Series: Iritis Architecture.
Series History: October 2013.
Photographs in Series: Seven.
Series Number in Collection: Nine.
Collection: THE IRITIS COLLECTION.
Collection History: Sept to Nov 2013.
Copyright 2013 Nawfal Johnson Nur ~ All Rights Reserved.
Penang, Malaysia.

Title:  IRITIS ARCHITECTURE, NO.2, EDIT G, Var.2. Series:  Iritis Architecture. Series History:  October 2013. Photographs in Series:  Six. Series Number in Collection:  Nine. Collection:  THE IRITIS COLLECTION. Collection History:  Sept to Nov 2013. Copyright 2013 Nawfal Johnson Nur ~ All Rights Reserved. Penang, Malaysia.

Title: IRITIS ARCHITECTURE, NO.2, EDIT G, Var.2 – Same view as No.1, but with different editing.
Series: Iritis Architecture.
Series History: October 2013.
Photographs in Series: Seven.
Series Number in Collection: Nine.
Collection: THE IRITIS COLLECTION.
Collection History: Sept to Nov 2013.
Copyright 2013 Nawfal Johnson Nur ~ All Rights Reserved.
Penang, Malaysia.

 

Title:  IRITIS ARCHITECTURE, NO.3, EDIT C, Var.3. Series:  Iritis Architecture. Series History:  October 2013. Photographs in Series:  Six. Series Number in Collection:  Nine. Collection:  THE IRITIS COLLECTION. Collection History:  Sept to Nov 2013. Copyright 2013 Nawfal Johnson Nur ~ All Rights Reserved. Penang, Malaysia.

Title: IRITIS ARCHITECTURE, NO.3, EDIT C, Var.3:  Same view as No1, and No2, but this one in Color.
Series: Iritis Architecture.
Series History: October 2013.
Photographs in Series: Seven.
Series Number in Collection: Nine.
Collection: THE IRITIS COLLECTION.
Collection History: Sept to Nov 2013.
Copyright 2013 Nawfal Johnson Nur ~ All Rights Reserved.
Penang, Malaysia.

 

Title:  IRITIS ARCHITECTURE, NO.4, EDIT F, Var.1. Series:  Iritis Architecture. Series History:  October 2013. Photographs in Series:  Six. Series Number in Collection:  Nine. Collection:  THE IRITIS COLLECTION. Collection History:  Sept to Nov 2013. Copyright 2013 Nawfal Johnson Nur ~ All Rights Reserved. Penang, Malaysia.

Title: IRITIS ARCHITECTURE, NO.4, EDIT F, Var.1.
Series: Iritis Architecture.
Series History: October 2013.
Photographs in Series: Seven.
Series Number in Collection: Nine.
Collection: THE IRITIS COLLECTION.
Collection History: Sept to Nov 2013.
Copyright 2013 Nawfal Johnson Nur ~ All Rights Reserved.
Penang, Malaysia.

 

Title:  IRITIS ARCHITECTURE, NO.5, EDIT J, Var.2. Series:  Iritis Architecture. Series History:  October 2013. Photographs in Series:  Six. Series Number in Collection:  Nine. Collection:  THE IRITIS COLLECTION. Collection History:  Sept to Nov 2013. Copyright 2013 Nawfal Johnson Nur ~ All Rights Reserved. Penang, Malaysia.

Title: IRITIS ARCHITECTURE, NO.5, EDIT J, Var.2:  Same view as No.4, but in color.
Series: Iritis Architecture.
Series History: October 2013.
Photographs in Series: Seven.
Series Number in Collection: Nine.
Collection: THE IRITIS COLLECTION.
Collection History: Sept to Nov 2013.
Copyright 2013 Nawfal Johnson Nur ~ All Rights Reserved.
Penang, Malaysia.

Title:  IRITIS ARCHITECTURE, NO.6. Series:  Iritis Architecture. Series History:  October 2013. Photographs in Series:  Six. Series Number in Collection:  Nine. Collection:  THE IRITIS COLLECTION. Collection History:  Sept to Nov 2013. Copyright 2013 Nawfal Johnson Nur ~ All Rights Reserved. Penang, Malaysia.

Title: IRITIS ARCHITECTURE, NO.6.
Series: Iritis Architecture.
Series History: October 2013.
Photographs in Series: Seven.
Series Number in Collection: Nine.
Collection: THE IRITIS COLLECTION.
Collection History: Sept to Nov 2013.
Copyright 2013 Nawfal Johnson Nur ~ All Rights Reserved.
Penang, Malaysia.

 

Title:  IRITIS ARCHITECTURE, NO.7. Series:  Iritis Architecture. Series History:  October 2013. Photographs in Series:  Seven. Series Number in Collection:  Nine. Collection:  THE IRITIS COLLECTION. Collection History:  Sept to Nov 2013. Copyright 2013 Nawfal Johnson Nur ~ All Rights Reserved. Penang, Malaysia.

Title: IRITIS ARCHITECTURE, NO.7.
Series: Iritis Architecture.
Series History: October 2013.
Photographs in Series: Seven.
Series Number in Collection: Nine.
Collection: THE IRITIS COLLECTION.
Collection History: Sept to Nov 2013.
Copyright 2013 Nawfal Johnson Nur ~ All Rights Reserved.
Penang, Malaysia.

Advertisements

PERBADANAN, No 5, with Metal Archway, PUTRAJAYA Interpreted by Nawfal

PERBADANAN, No 5, with Metal Archway, PUTRAJAYA Interpreted by Nawfal

Title: “PERBADANAN, No 5,” with Metal Archway, PUTRAJAYA Interpreted by Nawfal.
Creation Year: 2013 / Aug.
Series Name: PUTRAJAYA Interpreted by Nawfal.
Photo Number in Series: 005.
Location: The location of all the photographs in this, “PUTRAJAYA Interpreted by Nawfal” series, were created photographing architecture in the federal territory. The Malaysian federal territory, PUTRAJAYA, is the administrative capital of Malaysia. There are two other Federal Territories in Malaysia, they are, Labuan and Kuala Lumpur. Kuala Lumpur is the national capital; and, Labuan is an offshore international financial centre.

ARCHIVAL PRINTS and GALLERY QUALITY CANVAS PRINTS:
** Click on the image to go to my Sales Page at Imagekind.com . Thank you! **

*** This is my 503rd Photo-Blog Post! I began my Photo-Blog in April 2005! I was going to mention my 500th Blog Post – but I got carried away with posting and blazed right by it: I’m hearing bells – Ding-Dong-Ding-Dong… Not that this is at all important, but I was hoping to be over 100,000 views by my 500th post, but I am a little short on views to make that goal: I’m at 99,582 views.

I just hope that my photography ‘speaks’ to people, at least in some small way.

Thank you for visiting my photo-blog: I appreciate your seeing my art photography.

OSK PLAZA ABSTRACTION

OSK PLAZA ABSTRACTION

Title: “OSK PLAZA ABSTRACTION”
Building: OSK PLAZA
Completion Year: 1984.
Floors: 24.
Location: Jalan Ampang, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.
Photo Year: 2009.

Uploaded by BEHIND the LENS with Nawfal Nur on 12 Jan 09, 11.20AM MYT.

Side Note: Make sure that if you are shooting architecture in the urban environment, that you DON’T BELIEVE that the names on the building are the names of the building! Did you catch that? The biggest name on this building is BANK OF CHINA, although, OSK is on the building as well, if you don’t know any better, or don’t do your research, you would believe it is the Bank of China Building, but it is NOT. It is the OSK PLAZA (I’ve also seen PLAZA OSK).

Good Luck!

Remember your Tripod!

Photographed by Nawfal Nur

Remember your Tripod!

You never know when the nighttime photography opportunity will arise. Keep your tripod in your car trunk.

Nighttime is my favorite time to see things for photos, but a tripod is essential…a good tripod.

Something that is more important for sharp images at nighttime, more important than high-priced glass (lenses) or a fancy camera, is a solid, heavy tripod.  A tripod that will keep your camera focusing on the same spot over long exposures.

For this shot, I used my SLIK ABLE – 300DX Tripod. It’s heavy, sturdy and easy to setup and adjust.  The center post on this tripod will also reverse for really low angle opportunities.

I also use a Bogan 3001 with a Manfrotto #352 Ball & Socket Head, but this one I usually use in my table-top studio.

So, next time you are out photographing in lowlight, throw in the tripod just in case you need it.

Good Luck!

Lebuh King – 1 Block, Edit B

Lebuh King – 1 Block, Edit B, originally uploaded by fine-grain. *See at the bottom of this entry, for a link to a larger view*

This week I’ll be starting a new project and quite busy for about three weeks: I suspect I won’t be on Flickr much, probably.

That being the case, today I wanted to work on a personal project: A very massive and time consuming project it ended up becoming. I wanted to do a big project for my Penang Architecture Portfolio…”Lebuh King – 1 Block, Edit B, is “The Project” I worked on today.

A side note: I’m not quite sure why the biggest image I could upload was stuck at 1024 wide – the file I uploaded was 3000+ pixels wide. Hummmm. I’ll see if I can reload the photo…(Update: No, the damned thing won’t load up the proper sized image, so What’ the ….)

OK, anyway, this is a FULL Block Photograph, taken along Lebuh King, in Little India, Penang, between Lebuh Gereja and Lebuh China.

I went early in the morning so to avoid some of the Sunday morning shoppers and tourists, etc. Nevertheless, as I started, there was one obstacle after another getting in my way…cars parked where I needed to be, people, shop carts, it was madness!

To say this is a huge task to take a panorama like this is an understatement. It’s easy to take a panorama with all sorts of distortion and uncorrected perspective, but to change the perspective on each shot and then attempt to make it line up, in a straight line afterward, is kind of a royal pain, but educational.

This image is a series of 16 shots.

Each image was Perspective Corrected (to the best fit for the adjoining of all images).

Each image was hand placed and aligned. Minor aberrations were removed and corrected. That said, this image is not exactly “factual” – it can’t be under the circumstances. Some architectural details needed to be removed just to adjoin the separate images.

Shooting time was about 30 minutes. Image processing and editing work was 16-hours.

The original image is nearly 26,000 pixels wide. I had to up my virtual memory to 6GB so that the software wouldn’t crash – could sure use a duel or quad core machine.

I discovered that probably the best way to do this type of shot is using a rail-system, like camera crews use in the making of movies. I would need to partition off a section of road (probably need Polis Permission to do that, LOLOL), set up a rail system, place my tripod and camera on there and roll it along down the road as I take pictures.

I used my tripod, but with all the bumps in the road, and the double parked cars in the way and other obstructions, I was never assured that my camera was in the same alignment each time the shutter was released – VERY PROBLEMATIC! Each time the angle changes even a little bit, the perspective is totally jacked-up! The frustrations of keeping everything lined up had to come later when working on the computer.

If I had had the time and the forethought, I would have taken with me a 100-foot measuring tape, lay out a very straight line, marked with spray paint, so I know where my tripod feet need to be placed, etc. However, I’m wondering if that constitutes “destruction or defacing of public property” by marking the road, hehehehehe. Oh well, may be worthwhile finding out, ; ^ )

That would solve the straight line problem, but then you have the other angles to keep lined up (the ups & downs and the level of the camera). Potholes are still a problem in this regard.

Because of the close working distance, in some sections of the road, not all the building parts were captured, so that is why some of the buildings are sliced. Other portions were just so badly out of perspective, that the only option was to chop them off at the offending level.

Using the “Stitching” software was tried first, but I was not happy with the way it creates unusual shaped merged images (sideway S-images), so that each image fits the puzzle (so to speak). Plus, the perspective is still messed up when using the “Stitch” software.

Anyway, I never tried shooting the entire length of a city block, so this is the resulting project for Lebuh King, from Lebuh Gereja to Lebuh China. A wonderful mix of historic architecture in one shot!

I just wish that you could see the 3000 pixel-wide sized image I had planned to upload to my gallery – Oh Well…This will have to do, but it’s not the same effect as the “Big-Ass” Shot!

Uploaded by fine-grain on 22 Oct 07, 1.52AM MYT.

PS: I hope this works – I’m uploading the larger 3000+ wide pixel image so you can get a better look at the details in this work. Wish me luck… Update: Nope, can’t seem to get an image that is “wide” to show up properly here or at Flickr. What the Hell! What! Panoramic Images are not taken into consideration for images sent to Flickr and WordPress. A little grumpy now…What’s wrong with scrolling a little sideways to see the full, big image on the screen, it’s not that big of a pain-in-the-ass to do that – Most people probably wouldn’t mind sliding the scroll bar sideways to see the larger image.

Well, sorry folks, but we are stuck with seeing the 1024-pixel-wide image. Oh Well, that’s life!

Lebuh King Historic Preservation Image, from Lebuh Gereja to Lebuh China, in Little India, Georgetown, Penang, Malaysia.  Photography by Nawfal Nur, All Rights Reserved - The image is meant for “viewing” only!  No copying or saving, please!

Can You Feel It?, Edit C

The camera is superior to the eye, and the photograph can, and ideally should, portray the world more graphic than reality itself.” Andreas Feininger (1906 – 1999)

 Can You Feel It?, Edit C, originally uploaded by fine-grain.

“Can You Feel It” is obviously about texture. The original is quite colorful and nice, but I wanted you to “feel” the photograph by creating this version, in this way. The rough textured wall, the smooth metal on the grille, the sharp barbed wire on the water pipe, the battered, gravel, asphalt road in front of the door. So…”can you feel it?”

MENARA MAXIS – Kuala Lumpur’s Built Environment

Menara MAXIS, by Nawfal Nur, 2003, All Rights Reserved

 

MENARA1
MAXIS, v.2
© 2003 Nawfal Nur
All Rights Reserved
Location: Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
Photo Taken from Nikko Hotel

Chances are that if you travel to Kuala Lumpur, one of the first things that stands out are the Petronas Towers. You start seeing the towers from many miles away from the city (with clear skies). These towers are difficult to miss: They stand 452 meters (1,483 feet), with 88 floors, and a skybridge holds the two towers together at the 41st and 42nd floors.

When you stand outdoors in downtown Kuala Lumpur, many people, especially tourists will automatically be drawn to the Petronas Towers, ignoring, possibly, every other piece of architecture in the surrounding built environs.

If looking for a landmark to keep your bearings in Kuala Lumpur, the Towers make for a good indicator of where you are, and if you want to go to Kuala Lumpur City Centre (KLCC), just head in the direction of the tallest towers in the city.

Now with that all said, you may be thinking that this is yet another photograph of the “Towers”, and some other building just stepped in the way as I triggered the shutter button…Wrong! This is actually a photograph of the Menara Maxis (the cool looking building in the foreground).

I purposely took the photograph to position the Towers in the background. This perspective is unusual as the Petronas Towers are typically the center of attention in Kuala Lumpur architecture photography. This composition may seem blasphemous to some; but
sometimes, rules of composition are meant to be broken, or at least, experimented with.

In this photograph, the Towers are put to work as a backdrop for the building in front, the Menara Maxis. The over all architectural designs, the lighting styles, the size differentials, and the flow of lines are different enough between the two structures (the Petronas Towers being two structures, but spoke of as one whole building here), and these design characteristics keep them visually separated without needing to blur (by camera or software) the Towers in the background.

The composition is made whole with foreground and background. The cropping is kept close and vertically panoramic, thus forcing the viewer’s attention on these structures only. This compo-cropping strategy may also create an illusion, making the buildings appear impressively tall – even though they are impressive and tall anyway.

Though dwarfed by the Petronas Towers, the Menara Maxis is quite an imposing building on its own, standing at 212 meters (696 feet) tall, and with 49 floors. The architect of the building was Kevin Roche John Dinkeloo & Associates, and construction finished in 1998. The Menara Maxis is a stunning building in daylight, but even more interesting flooded by a sea of illumination at nighttime.

I think the Menara Maxis is a really super design and great addition to the Kuala Lumpur skyline.


1Menara means Tower.