eye photography

This is what IRITIS Looks Like

IF you ever wondered what IRITIS Looks Like, It is like this (see the photo):

"My Eye on Iritis!" Day 3 Iritis, 19 APR 2013, IMG_0915, EDIT E, NJN667. Copyright by Me.

“My Eye on Iritis!”
Day 3 Iritis, 19 APR 2013, IMG_0915, EDIT E, NJN667.
Copyright by Me.

I sit here and ponder life.

Well, being that I have Iritis AGAIN, for the umpteenth time, I am not even supposed to be at the computer:  I don’t make a very good patient.

I guess I feel obligated to share any information I can with other people who suffer from Ankylosing Spondylitis (AS), because one of the possible complications you may face during your life’s struggles with AS, is dealing with eye problems, which seem to go together with AS.

First, if you are new to AS, you can find a lot of information about this Spondyloarthopathy disease at the American College of Rheumatology , or, from the Spondylitis Association of America !  Both are great resources for AS information.

Second, if you are new to having AS, and you have never had Iritis before, you need to be VERY AWARE of your symptoms, because if left untreated, Iritis can lead to blindness.

The main reason I go through the PAIN of taking photos of my affected eyeball is so that anyone coming to my blog for Iritis information will be able to see what an eyeball with Iritis can look like.

THUS, if your eye looks like mine (in the photo above), and you also have some or all the following symptoms, you may have Iritis:

  1. Eye feels “heavy”.
  2. Eye looks bloodshot.
  3. When you close your eyelid and touch around the eye, it is painful to the touch (even the smallest bit of pressure).
  4. Photo-phobia:  Very sensitive to light – especially sunlight (light causes pain).
  5. Looking at things close-up is very painful.
  6. Throbbing pain in the eye.
  7. If the affected eyeball’s pupil is smaller than the non-affected eye – THIS IS SERIOUS ALREADY – GET MEDICAL HELP NOW!

Symptoms can change rapidly (for the worse) with Iritis:

By day number three, this time, my iris was stuck (inflamed badly).   Thus, in number 7 (above), when the pupil does not get bigger, smaller, or change at all in different lighting conditions, then your iritis is very bad already and you need medical help.

In medical terminology, here is some information from iritis.org:

Iritis is inflammation predominantly located in the iris of the eye. Inflammation in the iris is more correctly classified as anterior uveitis.  The ciliary body can also be inflamed and this would then be called iridocyclitis.  When the iris is inflamed, white blood cells (leukocytes) are shed into the anterior chamber of the eye where they can be observed on slit lamp examination floating in the convection currents of the aqueous humor. These cells can be counted and form the basis for rating the degree of inflammation.  [Source:  http://www.iritis.org/index.php ]

In short, it is ‘like’ Arthritis of the Eye.

So, I am here pondering life.  In addition, if you are having an Iritis flare-up, then you should stay away from the computer as much as possible.  IF you need to be at the computer, then be disciplined:  Work for one hour and then rest for an hour.  If you do not rest your eyes, the condition can last longer, and you may develop Iritis in the other eye (the “good” eye)…this has happened to me before so I know it is true.

It is time to get away from the computer.  I’ll have more Art Photography posted here soon:  I have started a new Abstract series and I am enthusiastically hoping to show it here…when the eyeball permits.

 

DAY-3-IRITIS, EDIT B

Day-3 Iritis, Edit B, btl

This is what Iritis looks like.

This shot was taken on Day-3: Right now, I’m on Day-7, and it’s getting worse I think.

I’m putting this up here because I get a lot of people coming to my photography journal [ right here… ] who are seeking information about Iritis and it helps to see a good photo of what Iritis looks like, and this is it!

IRITIS SYMPTOMS

If your eyeball is having any of these symptoms, or if you have any of these conditions, then take it serious…"Listen" to what your eyeball is telling you (so to speak):
1) Eyeball is Feeling Painful.
2) Eyeball Feels Heavy/Sluggish.
3) If you have Ankylosing Spondylitis (like I have), or another Auto-Immune Disease.
4) If your eye is turning red (like this in the photo).
5) If your eye is VERY SENSITIVE to light.
6) If your eyesight is getting blurry or cloudy.
7) If your eye is feeling scratchy (like a sandpaper type of feeling).
8) If the affected eyeball’s pupil appears smaller than the other eyeball’s pupil.
And,
9) If the affected eyeball is sensitive (painful) to the touch (close eyelid and gently touch around the eye).

IF YOU HAVE ANY or all of these symptoms – YOU BETTER GET YOURSELF TO THE OPHTHALMOLOGIST ASAP!!!

If Iritis is left untreated, it can possibly cause Glaucoma or Blindness.

The Following is the Treatment for Iritis as I Usually Get Treatment (and this will probably vary depending on doctor and severity of Iritis):

Beginning Treatment:
1) Prednisolone Drops (4 times daily) [PRED FORTE – Prednisolone acetate 1% ]
2) Infectoflam (applied at nighttime) [NOVARTISA – FLUOROMETHOLONE 0.1% & Gentamiin 0.3% and other active ingredients ]

IF the pain continues and the Iris gets stuck (the dark pupil stays small even in dark conditions), go back to your doctor for more aggressive measures.

For me, the next step FOR TREATMENT will probably be…

1) Steroid Pills. These can and usually cause Gastritis (the rolling around on the ground in pain type of Gastritis). You may have to take something to protect your stomach when taking Steroid Pills.

2) The scariest treatment I’ve had FOR IRITIS, is a SHOT of Steroids directly into the eyeball. This is usually the quickest way that I know to start the curing process for Iritis, but it is also the most severe measure as well (that I am aware of).

Note of Caution – This is only an informational write-up on Iritis, IF you even suspect Iritis as a cause of your eyeball pain – GET TO THE DOCTOR TO SEEK OUT THE CAUSE AND GET A TREATMENT BASED ON YOUR SEVERITY OF IRITIS!

WHAT YOU SHOULD DO IF YOU HAVE IRITIS:

1) GO to your doctor right away! Don’t wait if you suspect Iritis!
2) Take your meds on time.
3) MUCH REST!!! Don’t use the computer (like I’m doing right now, but this is important to me also, to share info…I’ll rest soon).
4) Follow up with your doctor IF the eyeball continues to cause you pain. You may need another plan of treatment.

Hope this helps anyone who suspects Iritis as causing your eyeball pain:  I have two other entries on Iritis here at Behind the Lens – if you do a search in my blog, you should find them.   For me, this is a recurring condition, WHICH I DO NOT ENJOY!

Good Luck!

Eye with Colored Contact, Edit G (But in B&W)

Eye with Colored Contact, Edit G, originally uploaded by fine-grain.

Eye with a colored contact lens (& textured design).

Thanks to my model, Zuhairah, I owe her 2-Panadol for asking her to stand in direct sunlight, and looking in its general direction.

Notes about this Image:

This was a spur-of-the-moment shot. I was with my model and noticed she had her contacts in and asked her to go stand out in the sun, and she obliged – very kind heart!

The interesting thing is that the original looked nothing like this. I cropped, adjusted, and re-adjusted many times, using several different editions until I got the look I needed to get.

I think the total time it took to get this look was about 6-hours of Paint Shop Pro and Photo Impact work.

I had a general idea of what I wanted, but again, it wasn’t until I saw it, that I knew the look I was going for and needed.

And then, I said, enough is enough, I like this.

Getting in Close

Cat’s Eye, Edit B

Our eye must constantly measure, evaluate. We alter our perspective by a slight bending of the knees; we convey the chance meeting of lines by a simple shifting of our heads a thousandth of an inch…. We compose almost at the same time we press the shutter, and in placing the camera closer or farther from the subject, we shape the details – taming or being tamed by them.” – Henri Cartier-Bresson – on composition. “American Photo”, September/October 1997, page: 76

Another way of getting a very close view of your subject, as in this shot, is to crop the image to include the ‘main subject’ AND DISCARD the rest.

The cropping method is also a safer way of photographing when your subject is an ‘eye’, which is highly sensitive to light (don’t want to damage anyone’s eye by being careless). I backed up the light considerably on this macro shot, and then positioned the light at a slight angle (the light is off-camera). In the final image (shown here), the main subject remains, and the rest was cropped. You can see the ring-flash makes a cool catch light in the eye.

The freedom to liberally crop brings up an important point in favor of high megapixel cameras: A high-MP camera (12 or 16 megapixels for example) is beneficial, because there is plenty of room for cropping…the original image will give you more leeway for tight cropping than a camera with less megapixels, naturally.

This image was shot with a Canon G2 (4.1MP), so the original image was not very large; thus, the initial image needed to be very accurate and the main subject positioned to take up more space in the frame. Therefore, less cropping was necessary. It would have been nice, however, to have the “freedom to liberally crop.”

Over all, when shooting for detail, move in close; and if that is not possible (or safe), then considering cropping the image to get to the main subject.