Malaysia

HD 188753 Abstract Expressionism Pointillism by Nawfal Johnson

A New Artwork, “HD 188753,” – Abstract Expressionism Pointillism by Nawfal Johnson

"HD 188753," (detail of artwork)  Abstract Expressionism Pointillism by Nawfal Johnson.

“HD 188753,” (detail of artwork) Abstract Expressionism Pointillism by Nawfal Johnson.

"HD 188753," (full artwork)  Abstract Expressionism Pointillism by Nawfal Johnson.

“HD 188753,” (full artwork) Abstract Expressionism Pointillism by Nawfal Johnson.

Artist’s Statement about “HD 188753”

Creation Finished Date: 14 March 2014.

Title Significance to this Artwork: 

There are three gold suns in this tightly clustered solar system: There is one sun in the centre (the focal point); and then the second golden sun just lower and to the left of centre; and the third golden sun is in the upper right quadrant, surrounded by loosely floating space debris, like asteroids.

 My Motivation for this Artwork

I was motivated to do this art piece by an article I read on the website, SPACE.COM.  There is a quote from the article that describes a unique triple-sun system:

“The triple-star system, HD 188753, is located 149 light-years away in the constellation Cygnus.   The primary star is like our Sun, weighing 1.06 solar masses. The other two stars form a tightly bound pair, which is separated from the primary by about the Sun-Saturn distance.” (Source: http://www.space.com/1311-triple-sunset-planet-discovered-3-star-system.html ).

Artwork Genre 

I classify this type of artwork as ‘Abstract Expressionism Pointillism.’ Every dot, and every solid-looking object in this art piece, is a dot. Due to the size of the dots and the viscosity of the inks used, the inks may have run-together to form solid-looking objects; but rest-assured, this is completely a Pointillism artwork.

Number of Dots

Based on a one-square-inch section of this work, I calculated that there are about 273,000 (give-or-take a couple thousand) dots that form this 12 inch x 9 inch artwork. The dots that make up this artwork range from .35mm to about 3mm in sizes. My favourite Pointillism tools to work with are my alcohol-based ink markers; and I favour my KOH-I-NOOR RAPIDOGRAPH, and FABER-CASTELL TG1-S Technical Pens.

Here is a quote, from me, about creating Pointillism:

To be a Pointillist, you have to be slightly crazy. With arthritic wrists, painkillers help, as I repeatedly pound the art paper with tiny dots for sometimes up to four or five hours straight. It also helps to love Heavy Metal music, so my most inspiring song for creating this piece was “BORN,” by NEVERMORE. It has an extremely fast time-scale, and it is also one of my favourite songs – it is musically and lyrically, genius. It isn’t until after I am about 75% done that I see emerging patterns in my ‘madness’ of ‘dotting’ the paper, then I can complete or stress the patterns until I feel the patterns are ‘born’, and then the work eventually ends, with the last dot, and the final note of music.”

Days to Complete this Work: 13-Days.

Approximate Number of Hours to Complete this Work:  52-Hours.

Copyright 2014 Nawfal Johnson.  All Rights Reserved.
Penang, Malaysia.

The Sales Site for this Artwork (the Original and Archival Prints) is at this link:
http://www.saatchiart.com/art/New-Media-HD-188753/326658/1952490/view

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49, 48, AND 47 FROM THE 49-PROJECT

I’M DOING THINGS A BIT DIFFERENTLY TODAY, SHOWING THREE IMAGES FROM THE 49-PROJECT, BUT IN REVERSE ORDER

“THE 49-PROJECT" by Nawfal Johnson, of  Penang, Malaysia. The title is: '#47 of 49’.  The Motivation for this Project is that I turned 49 years old. This year I add an image to the challenge. High-Quality Art prints and canvases of this artwork can be purchased at my Imagekind.com Sales Gallery. Thank you for your kind visit and I hope you take some extra time to look at all of my images in THE 49-PROJECT. http://nawfalnur.imagekind.com/ and look for THE 49-PROJECT Gallery!  Thank you!

“THE 49-PROJECT” by Nawfal Johnson, of Penang, Malaysia. The title is: ‘#47 of 49’. The Motivation for this Project is that I turned 49 years old. This year I add an image to the challenge. High-Quality Art prints and canvases of this artwork can be purchased at my Imagekind.com Sales Gallery. Thank you for your kind visit and I hope you take some extra time to look at all of my images in THE 49-PROJECT. http://nawfalnur.imagekind.com/ and look for THE 49-PROJECT Gallery! Thank you!

“THE 49-PROJECT" by Nawfal Johnson, of  Penang, Malaysia. The title is: '#48 of 49’.  The Motivation for this Project is that I turned 49 years old. This year I add an image to the challenge. High-Quality Art prints and canvases of this artwork can be purchased at my Imagekind.com Sales Gallery. Thank you for your kind visit and I hope you take some extra time to look at all of my images in THE 49-PROJECT. http://nawfalnur.imagekind.com/ and look for THE 49-PROJECT Gallery!  Thank you!

“THE 49-PROJECT” by Nawfal Johnson, of Penang, Malaysia. The title is: ‘#48 of 49’. The Motivation for this Project is that I turned 49 years old. This year I add an image to the challenge. High-Quality Art prints and canvases of this artwork can be purchased at my Imagekind.com Sales Gallery. Thank you for your kind visit and I hope you take some extra time to look at all of my images in THE 49-PROJECT. http://nawfalnur.imagekind.com/ and look for THE 49-PROJECT Gallery! Thank you!

“THE 49-PROJECT" by Nawfal Johnson, of  Penang, Malaysia. The title is: '#49 of 49’.  The Motivation for this Project is that I turned 49 years old. This year I add an image to the challenge. High-Quality Art prints and canvases of this artwork can be purchased at my Imagekind.com Sales Gallery. Thank you for your kind visit and I hope you take some extra time to look at all of my images in THE 49-PROJECT. http://nawfalnur.imagekind.com/ and look for THE 49-PROJECT Gallery!  Thank you!

“THE 49-PROJECT” by Nawfal Johnson, of Penang, Malaysia. The title is: ‘#49 of 49’. The Motivation for this Project is that I turned 49 years old. This year I add an image to the challenge. High-Quality Art prints and canvases of this artwork can be purchased at my Imagekind.com Sales Gallery. Thank you for your kind visit and I hope you take some extra time to look at all of my images in THE 49-PROJECT. http://nawfalnur.imagekind.com/ and look for THE 49-PROJECT Gallery! Thank you!

I shall keep on plugging away at this until ALL 49 Images of THE 49-PROJECT are published here!

Thanks for all your continuing support by seeing my photo-blog.

Please help me if you can, by either making a Donation or Buy me a Cup of Coffee – It would really help me so I can continue to create artwork and art photographs, so I can continue to share with you.  Thank you for all your good wishes and generosity.  All my Best,

Nawfal Johnson

 

 

OSK PLAZA ABSTRACTION

OSK PLAZA ABSTRACTION

Title: “OSK PLAZA ABSTRACTION”
Building: OSK PLAZA
Completion Year: 1984.
Floors: 24.
Location: Jalan Ampang, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.
Photo Year: 2009.

Uploaded by BEHIND the LENS with Nawfal Nur on 12 Jan 09, 11.20AM MYT.

Side Note: Make sure that if you are shooting architecture in the urban environment, that you DON’T BELIEVE that the names on the building are the names of the building! Did you catch that? The biggest name on this building is BANK OF CHINA, although, OSK is on the building as well, if you don’t know any better, or don’t do your research, you would believe it is the Bank of China Building, but it is NOT. It is the OSK PLAZA (I’ve also seen PLAZA OSK).

Good Luck!

PETRONAS TOWERS, v.3, Edit D

PETRONAS TOWERS, v.3, Edit D

PETRONAS TOWERS
Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
Creation Year: 2009

Vital Statistics:
Architects: Pelli Clarke Pelli
Location: Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
Completion Date: 1998
Cost: $1.6 billion
Height: 1,483 feet
Stories: 88
Materials: Concrete, Steel
Facing Materials: Aluminum, Stainless Steel
Engineer(s): Thornton-Tomasetti and Ranhill Bersekutu

KLCC FOUNTAIN, No.62, Edit B

KLCC FOUNTAIN, No.62, Edit B

Title: KLCC FOUNTAIN, No.62, Edit B
What is it? Urban Fountain between the SURIA KLCC and the PETRONAS Park, just at twilight, when the lights are turned on in the pool.
Location: Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

Uploaded by BEHIND the LENS with Nawfal Nur on 27 Dec 08, 3.52PM MYT.

Remember your Tripod!

Photographed by Nawfal Nur

Remember your Tripod!

You never know when the nighttime photography opportunity will arise. Keep your tripod in your car trunk.

Nighttime is my favorite time to see things for photos, but a tripod is essential…a good tripod.

Something that is more important for sharp images at nighttime, more important than high-priced glass (lenses) or a fancy camera, is a solid, heavy tripod.  A tripod that will keep your camera focusing on the same spot over long exposures.

For this shot, I used my SLIK ABLE – 300DX Tripod. It’s heavy, sturdy and easy to setup and adjust.  The center post on this tripod will also reverse for really low angle opportunities.

I also use a Bogan 3001 with a Manfrotto #352 Ball & Socket Head, but this one I usually use in my table-top studio.

So, next time you are out photographing in lowlight, throw in the tripod just in case you need it.

Good Luck!

“The Magic Pill” – RA DAY, 6 July 2008, Edit F

“The Magic Pill.” Well, there’s really NO “magic pill”, but for me with combating Ankylosing Spondylitis (AS), my weapon of choice is Voltaren, thus the big-“V”. It is an OK choice for AS.

However, there are OVER 100 types of Arthritis out there now!!! One source claims 171 types of Arthritis exist. Thus, depending on what you have, certain drugs may or may not relieve the swelling and pain.

Here in Malaysia, there is a launching of National RA Day…6th July. This is good because it will help bring awareness to the general public as well as help those who suffer from arthritis, and in this case, Rheumatoid Arthritis.

I wanted to do my part to spread the word, make people aware, and do something creative with my art photography to advertise the National RA Day.

If you are concerned about, experience RA, or know someone who suffers from RA, then please, get yourself educated on this disease so you can help yourself, or someone you care about!

What I couldn’t quite understand, however, was why would they hold an Arthritis talk-event in the early morning, and 8:30am is early for many of us, because it takes longer than that, some days, to start feeling halfway human and moving looser.  1PM  or 2PM would be a better time to have an Arthritis event, well, in my general opinion.

On a different note:  If you publish a blog from Flickr, DON’T believe it when it says it failed to publish the blog.  It told me that three times, and I came to WordPress and it was published three times.

Door & Window near old Ibu HQ Polis, Penang, v1

Door & Window near old Ibu HQ Polis, Penang, v1, originally uploaded by fine-grain.

Door & Window near old Ibu HQ Polis, Penang, v1

Colorful door and window of an abandoned house near the old, main Balai Polis, Penang.

This was a nighttime shot.

I’m not sure why, but WordPress and Flickr still don’t play very nice together. I much prefer my WordPress photography journals and the format here. However, Blogger is much more compatible with Flickr. Sending my images to Blogger is flawless. Whenever I blog my Flickr images, I always get this text above the image:

.flickr-photo { border: solid 2px #000000; }
.flickr-yourcomment { }
.flickr-frame { text-align: left; padding: 3px; }
.flickr-caption { font-size: 0.8em; margin-top: 0px; }

I know, it’s not that big a deal; nevertheless, it’s kind of irritating! This text does not show up in my Blogger journal.

Oh well, because I like WordPress much more than Blogger, I’ll just have to put up with this little inconvenience until WordPress and Flickr play nicer together.

Trishaw Peddler Resting along Lorong Madras

Trishaw Peddler Resting along Lorong Madras, originally uploaded by fine-grain.

A trishaw peddler rests inside his trishaw along Lorong Madras, Penang, Malaysia.

The key to showing the image like this is diligent cropping until I had only the subject showing in the frame. Everything else was distracting to me.

A tight crop works well to isolate your main subject. That is one benefit to a larger pixel count camera – the more cropping can be done and still have a good sized final image.

Be Happy! Crop until you Drop! Isolate your Subject!

The 50th Merdeka, Vespa Scooter Convoy from Terengganu: A Photo-Essay of their Stop in Penang.

“The 50th Merdeka, Vespa Scooter Convoy from Terengganu: A Photo-Essay of their Stop in Penang.”

 

Story & Photos by Nawfal Nur

Copyright 2007

All Rights Reserved

 

———————————–

KSK, Vespa Club, Frame 94-BTL

Photo One: Yellow Scooter – Close-up of “vespa”, chrome trim and red light. The yellow paint was fairly dirty, so I took a tissue and wiped it down, and no one seemed to mind.  After all, the group had already traveled several hundred kilometers and a little dirt on the scooters would be natural.

KSK, Vespa Club, Frame 79-BTL

Photo Two: Orange Vespa with stormy sky in the background, Malaysian flag hanging down into the frame of this shot.

KSK, Vespa Club, Frame 83-BTL

Photo Three: KSK Member sitting on his Vespa and an array of other scooters around him.

KSK, Vespa Club, Frame 87-BTL

Photo Four: An elaborate eagle decoration on the front bumper of a Vespa scooter.

KSK, Vespa Club, Frame 112-BTL

Photo Five: A decorative hand-stamped chrome visor: The design is of a Vespa scooter.

KSK, Vespa Club, Frame 97-BTL

Photo Six: An Abstract shot of a pink Vespa’s front bumper and chrome horn covering.

KSK, Vespa Club, Frame 109-BTL

Photo Seven: An intimidating fixture of a Viking Warrior – Maybe it’s Thor!

KSK, Vespa Club, Frame 96-BTL

Photo Eight: This is the oldest Vespa in the group: It is a circa., 1964 Vespa scooter, in almost perfect condition.

KSK, Vespa Club, Frame 101-BTL

Photo Nine: Just me adding a little “bling” to the shot, by using a ‘lens’ effect to highlight the Malaysian flag. The light falloff was expected; and this shot I took from standing in the first lane of traffic between short pauses in the zooming by of vehicles.

————————————

© 2007 Nawfal Nur, All Rights Reserved

————————————

Little did I know that my wife would be coming home with an interesting photography challenge for me. However, proved to be a much needed break from the monotony of the day, and an educational-cultural experience that I had not expected.

KSK (Kelab Skuter Klasik), from Kuala Terengganu, is a branch of the Classic Vespa Scooter Club, here in Malaysia. This group was on a Vespa Scooter Convoy, in honor of the 50th year of Malaysian Independence (Merdeka).

Their ride started on the 22nd of August and would finish up on the 31st of August. They traveled from Kuala Terengganu to various stops, and ended up in Penang on the 27th of August, I had the opportunity to take some photographs of their classic, Italian Vespas. Their next destination was somewhere in Kedah.

Now, take into consideration that my Penang dialect of the Malay language is kind of atrocious, so I was trying to communicate badly with my Penang dialect, with dudes who were speaking perfectly great Terengganu-Malay dialect – what a fantastic interaction we had!

Here’s how this whole photo-shoot came about: My wife was coming home from work and noticed a group of about 20 guys, milling around a colorful array of vintage Vespa motor scooters. She naturally knew that I would want to photograph their bikes, and get a story out of it – that’s just the way I am!

The group of riders were resting near our home, about a 10-minute walk away. They had all gathered in an empty parking lot, out front of an unscrupulous night club: It gets shut down about every year for violations of various laws – that scummy place is a true ‘Menace To Society!’ However, where there’s scum, there is filth, and the two seem to exist in a symbiosis that benefits both sides, and leaves the neighborhood in disgust, but that’s another story.

My wife arrived home and told me the story of the scooter riders from Terengganu. After hearing her ‘CLIFFS NOTES’ version, I knew I needed to drop what I was doing, grab a camera and race over to the gathering.

It was 7:00PM when I left the house and the light outside was transforming into a light tobacco color. I knew I had little time to take some shots with available light, which is naturally my preference for this type of work. Artificial light coming from the camera, when shooting objects that range in distance from near to far, it tends to wash out the nearby objects and leaves the distant subjects in a fog of darkness. With limited time and no way to gather additional lighting equipment, I had to make due with my camera with a built in flash.

When I approached the riders, they seemed a bit perplexed: I can imagine some were thinking, “Why is this Mat Salleh (White Guy), coming up to us and checking out our rides?

I noticed that there were more scooters than riders, so some people were missing from their group of some 20 bikes. Maybe some had already gone for a bite to eat. Nevertheless, about 12 members had stayed behind with their rides.

I started by giving the group, the traditional Muslim “Salaam”, and no matter where you go, no matter what your ethnicity, or color of skin, a Muslim can break the ice with another Muslim by giving a heart-felt “Assalaam’mualaikum!” (Meaning: “Peace Be Upon You!”)

After that, I began the conversation with “Apa Khabar?” (How are you?), and then things went from there. I ran into some bumps and hills along the conversational journey, but I was generally making “heads & tails” of what was being said.

I asked them if I could take some photographs, and they were obliging. It didn’t appear that they had made any announcements to the Press, or had any Public Relations Plan for their trip. I assumed their long trip from Kuala Terengganu to Penang, and then Kedah, was simply out of patriotism for Malaysia’s special 50th birthday celebration, and for comradery with other Vespa club members.

The club members comprised of a mixture of seasoned, older riders, and very enthusiastic younger men; I would estimate their ages from 25 to 60 years old. Not that “fine lines” or “deep crevices” in the facial skin is a major concern of most men, you can still get a general estimate of a man’s age by their degree of “face linage.”

The younger club members were riding their father’s motor scooters. And, I imagine, the fathers had made similar trips for previous Merdeka Day celebrations. The scooters they were riding, were from the years 1964 to 1979. I’m sure that some of the club members were considerably younger than the older Vespas in their convoy.

Each bike had some elaborate decoration on it, along with one or more Malaysian flags (Jalur Gemilang), and were fastened somewhere on the handlebars or the back ends of the scooters. Each scooter, I noticed, was equipped with a spare tire, a few tools, bottles of water and odds & ends that may be necessary for a long trip.

By the time the chit-chat was over, and I had received their permission to take the shots, the sun was dropping behind the hills and it was already 7:10PM. I knew I was dangerously close to running out of usable ambient light, and I had to quickly pick a theme for this photo-essay, and then shoot as many shots as possible to cover the theme. If that wasn’t enough, to do it all in less than 30-minutes was a chore, but a pleasant one.

I chose to concentrate on the details of the antique Vespa scooters. And, coming from a Fine Art background and preferring that style, I decided to shoot this story in that way. Daylight was burning away fast and I didn’t want to depend too much on the flash in my camera, a very trusty and dependable Canon A620, that works fantastically in the studio for my Fine Art work, but not ideal for photojournalism. Nevertheless, it was the camera I had in my hands, and I was adjusting and adapting as I lost light.

The bikes were parked haphazardly in the parking lot, so I weaved in and out of the bikes looking for outstanding examples of Vespa craftsmanship, and handmade scooter accessories. There was a decorative eagle gracing the front bumper of one bike. A metal viking decoration on the front plate of another, and a hand stamped chrome visor with an outline of a scooter gracing the headlamp of another bike. It was a treasure trove of photographic goodies.

It wasn’t the most organized photo shoot I’ve been involved in, I have to admit that. All that I knew was that I had about 20 minutes to photograph. Plus, these guys weren’t paid models, so I didn’t want to take too much of their time; they were tired after a long, hot day’s ride and were still looking for a hotel where they could rest for the night.

Before it was time to “call the game due to darkness,” (See Note 1, below), I thought it may be nice to get a group shot of a few of the members with their scooters. The only suitable spot to line them up was on the sidewalk. That also meant that the only suitable spot to take photographs was from the middle of a very busy metropolitan roadway! It wasn’t the safest spot to plant myself for taking photographs, but I’m a bit crazy, and thought…”Why Not!

By this time, my wife had come back to observe the shoot: So, I put her to work!

She became the translator for me, to explain what I wanted from the members, and where to place the bikes. She also helped with the art direction: She’s multi-talented!

Yeah, OK! Technically, at this point, I should have been setting up some extra lighting: I’m a disgrace to “Strobists” everywhere! (See Note 2, below).

I knew that I should have a couple remote speedlights to get a decent group shot. But Hey! I was just trying to time traffic properly, to “safely” jump into the middle of the speedway for a few seconds; grab a shot, and then leap out of the way before getting run over by lunatic drivers. Attempting to set up strobes in the middle of the road seemed like lunacy to me, so I ditched that idea and just took a few shots with the tiny internal flash, and hoping for the best.

By 7:40PM, the sun had dropped out of sight behind the hills and the shooting was over.

We said our goodbyes to the members and wished them luck and safe journey for the rest of their convoy around North Malaysia. At that point, my wife and I were about to head home. It was sort of funny, as we were about to leave, one of the guys asked my wife, who I am in relationship to her. She explained that I was her husband. I guess, I just assumed they knew she was married to the crazy white-dude!

I spent the remainder of the evening getting the shots reviewed, edited, and then re-edited. I drafted a letter to a local newspaper, believing that this story would be a good Merdeka, local interest item. Links to the images were provided in the email to the Editor, so it would be easy for them to view the shots online, and at their leisure. I made it clear that if they did not reply to my correspondence, then I would be publishing the story and photographs to my Photography Journals (“Behind the Lens“). Sad to say….I didn’t hear anything from the Newspaper.

Well, their loss, I guess. I suppose if another newspaper or magazine wants to pick up this story, then that would be great – just contact me with details.

Otherwise, I’m just happy to know that I fulfilled what I felt was a “mission” to get this dedicated group of Vespa Club Members, some exposure about their historic, 50th Merdeka celebration, scooter convoy.

Note 1: An old Baseball ruling [started around 1930’s], where during doubleheaders, a daylight game could be stopped by the Umpire due to darkness, because the stadium lights weren’t allowed to be turned on during the daylight game. In the 1950’s, this ruling was relaxed.

Note 2: “Strobist” is a photography blog on professional lighting with Speedlites and other small flash units.

Photography Details:
Camera
: Canon A620
Place: Penang
Time: I only had about an half hour with them, from 7:10PM to 7:40PM. It started getting quite dark, so shooting conditions were NOT ideal. I had to use higher ISO settings and weak flash caused some problems (ARGH! ) However, under the circumstances, I did my best!
Software: Some retouching (reduce digital noise ) with Noiseware, and Lighting/Contrast adjustments with PhotoImpact 10.

Things for Making Thosai & Other South Indian Goodies, v1, Edit B

Things for Making Thosai, v1, Edit B, originally uploaded by fine-grain.

Ingredients and Tools for Making Thosai and other South Indian “Goodies!” ‘Thosai’ is sometimes referred to as a “South Indian Pancake.” Here we have a roller, dough, flour and a big metal strainer for getting fried foods out of hot oil.

*The dough here is probably for chapatti – a very nutritious and low fat South Indian Bread – my personal favorite.  Atta flour is used for making Chapatti.

Thosai is much bigger than an ‘American-style Pancake’, but also thinner. I took this shot early this morning while photographing in Farlim, which is a planned township on Penang Island, Malaysia.

Here’s a recipe for Thosai if you are interested:

Ingredients : Makes 10-12

1 cup

1/2 cup

1 1/2 teaspoons

1/2 cup

1 teaspoon

1 1/2 teaspoons

2 teaspoons

1/4 teaspoon

1

1

Uncooked rice

Blackgram dhal (urad dhal)

Dried yeast

Warm water

Sugar

Salt

Ghee or oil

Mustard seeds

Small onion, finely chopped

Fresh green chili, finely chopped

 If you want to know how to put all these ingredients together to make Thosai, then go here – I have no clue – but maybe some day I’ll learn how!

Gloriosa – My Favorite Flower (At this Time…)

GLORIOSA LILY-Orig01-Edit B-WPz

I don’t actually have much to say regarding this photo-journal entry, but I wanted to show you some of my studio flower work.

This is definitely one of those times where I’ll just let my pictures say a few words.

I do, however, want to tell you how lucky I feel that this beautiful species grows wild on the other side of my fence, among weeds, and piles of bricks long forgotten by some building contractor, some time, long ago.

The Gloriosa Lily is a remarkable flower that is very well suited to tropical life, in the wild, and it doesn’t need anyone to take care of it. The “technical books” say it likes rich soil and the roots need shade. But I’ll tell ya, it grows just wonderfully without help, and where it’s growing must be its perfect spot.

So, with that little bit said, here is my Studio Collection of the Gloriosa Lily, my favorite flower…at this time. Hope you enjoy seeing my interpretations of this wonderful flower.

GLORIOSA LILY-Orig15, Edit B-wpz

GLORIOSA LILY-Orig17, Edit B-wpz

GLORIOSA LILY-Orig19, Edit B-wpz

GLORIOSA LILY-Orig25, Edit B-wpz

GLORIOSA LILY-Orig213, Edit B-wpz

GLORIOSA LILY-Orig285, Edit B-wpz

GLORIOSA LILY-Orig271, Edit C-wpz

GLORIOSA LILY-Orig249, Edit B-wpz

GLORIOSA LILY-Orig237, Edit B-wpz

GLORIOSA LILY-Orig233, Edit D-wpz

GLORIOSA LILY-Orig229, Edit B-wpz

GLORIOSA LILY-Orig221, Edit B-wpz

*** Thanks for taking a look! ***

 

Double Decker Bike Rider in Penang

 

Double Decker Bike Rider in Penang, by Nawfal Nur

Today proved that the “best camera” you have is the one that you remembered to bring with you!

I had just picked up my kids from school and was on my way back to Tg. Tokong, looking for Nasi Kandar – not the best thing to do around 3pm (the food is not as hot or fresh at that time – IMHO), but we looked around anyway. Then, out of nowhere came two people riding these double decker bikes with all sorts of odds-and-ends strapped in the front, the rear and the sides.

They passed me by once and I thought, “Man, I got my camera…I need to get a shot of one of them,” but traffic was bad and they were headed in the opposite direction.

We didn’t find any nasi kandar open near Hillside at that time of day, but we did see a Malay food stall in operation near the reclamation project. So, we turned the car around and headed back.

Low and behold, there were the two bikers and they were headed in the same direction I was going. I sped up a little observing all traffic safety rules and regulations, of course, and overtook the two bikers, and pulled off to the side of the road about 50 meters ahead of them.

As I was getting my camera out of my Crumpler, one of the bikers blew right by me, but the girl biker was a little behind, so I had one chance, at least, to get a photo.

I quickly set my camera on Aperture Priority (I wanted good depth-of-field) and checked the shutter speed. It was a nice bright, yet overcast afternoon; nevertheless, I was able to manage a 1/250 second shutter speed – enough for this situation.

BLAMO!” Well, my camera doesn’t actually speak, but I pushed the shutter button and got one shot.

I think she was totally oblivious to me taking her picture as she rode by: She was listening to music as she peddled head & shoulders above everyone on that very high bike.

What this pair appeared to have done was to weld another bike frame to one with wheels. They peddle using the peddle from the top bike so the chain goes vertical down to the bottom frame. The steering mechanism is attached from the top frame to the bottom frame.

I’m just wondering how they started out their ride. I would suspect, they have to use a chair or ladder to get on and then never stop until they get to where they want to go and make sure they time the traffic lights; or that is, blaze on right through the red lights like so many of the Penang motorbike riders do, ignoring most traffic laws…but that’s another issue.

Yes, indeed, the best camera in your stable of cameras is the one that you have with you!