Still Life Liquid Photography

SPLASH-20110625_91, EDIT D, NJN2

SPLASH-20110625_91, EDIT D, NJN2, originally uploaded by Nawfal Nur.

 

SHELL & BUBBLES, v.3

SHELL & BUBBLES, v.3, originally uploaded by Fine-Grain.

A Still Life Photograph of a shell and bubbles as it hits a surface of water. A study of stopping motion, rendering in Black & White, and what happens when irregular subject shapes hit standing water.

It’s NOT about the Software!

Blue Liquid & Onion Splash, v1, Edit D, np2

Title:  “Onion Splash in Blue Liquid”
Creation Year:  2008

The other day, I was asked the question:  “So, what software did you use to create this photograph?”

This is a question that many photographers may think is quite innocent; after all, photo editing has become the natural second step with digital photography.  Photographs are shot and then “FIXED” (or “Created”) in Photoshop.

Many people believe that any old photograph can be taken without care to the details, AND THEN, IT CAN BE ‘FIXED’ IN PHOTOSHOP!  My splash photographs are NOT created with software.  However, I admit, there is a certain amount of fine-tuning that may be necessary with images like this, for which there is a need to use photo editing software.

At the very basic core of photography, every photograph starts with an idea and a camera.  For me, software considerations come much later in the photo-making process.  For example, Proper Lighting is the main consideration to capturing a great looking splash photograph.  Fine-tuning the type of lighting, the positioning of lighting and the diffusing and flagging of lighting are important concerns for creating this type of photograph.  You also need a very fast burst of light to freeze the action.

In my opinion, mastering lighting and camera techniques are the foundation to good photography.

IF a good image is captured from the start, there is less work needed in post production using photo editing software.  I do my best to set up the props, place the lighting and make the needed adjustments to the camera.  It is a blessing if you need less time to fix shots because you planned the original photo-shoot properly.

To sum up the points:  Photo editing software should never be a substitution for planning a photograph properly in the first place.  Getting the details of the photo-shoot worked out meticulously ahead of time can save valuable time in post production.  Becoming a master lighting expert and knowing your equipment inside and out, is much more important than relying on photo editing software to get the effects digitally.  Don’t count on photo editing software to make the photograph for you.  For some types of art photography, software can help you piece together photo parts, work with layers, add textures, place text, position borders, add filters, adjust the details, and edit out the problems.  However, without first knowing quite well, the foundation of good photography, you may not have much to work with when using your photo editing software.