Long-Exposure

9-SECONDS ONLY

“9-Seconds, v. 5, Edit C”

9-Seconds, v5, Edit C - v.5 Copyright 2011 Nawfal Johnson Nur.  Original photograph created 3 Aug 2008.  The general idea behind this photograph was to capture a certain amount of time in one frame.  In this case, it was 9-Seconds.  9-Seconds Only.  The 9 shadow marks of the second hand movement shows the 9-seconds.

9-Seconds, v5, Edit C - v.5 Copyright 2011 Nawfal Johnson Nur. Original photograph created 3 Aug 2008. The general idea behind this photograph was to capture a certain amount of time in one frame. In this case, it was 9-Seconds. 9-Seconds Only. The 9 shadow marks of the second-hand movement shows the 9-seconds.

MOTIVATIONS:

When photographs are created, one of the silent ingredients that go into the composition is shutter speed.  By looking at the photograph, we can kind of tell what the general shutter speed is.  A photo of a speeding car shown in stop-action may be photographed with a shutter speed above 1/250 second – give or take a stop here or there.  A low-light conditions photo, shot at ISO100, will likely have  a slower shutter speed, and depending on MANY VARIABLES, the shutter speed used could be anywhere from a half-second to several seconds.

The point I’m attempting to make is that without having access to EXIF data, the viewer really does not have a clear idea of the shutter speed used to capture a photograph.  And in many cases, most viewers don’t care to know the shutter speed.

WHAT MAKES “9-SECONDS” DIFFERENT?

What was needed for this photograph was to create an image where the subject was time itself.  In the case of this photograph, “9-Seconds”, the magic of time is illustrated by the movement of the seconds hand.  In a way, the viewer may become curious and count the shadowy second-hand lines.  The viewer becomes involved in the photo in this way.  One thing for sure, this photo was created using a 9-seconds shutter speed, give or take a few milliseconds.

My BEST Advice for Nighttime – Low-Light Photography

"My BEST Advice for Nighttime – Low-Light Photography"

ANSON ROAD AT NIGHTTIME, Edit B, 10 Dec 2011, Copyright Nawfal Johnson Nur

"Anson Road at Nighttime, Edit B"
10 Dec 2011
Copyright 2011 Nawfal Johnson Nur

MOTIVATION:
Sometimes, I study the search terms that people use to get to my blog, "Behind the Lens," and then I attempt to write something useful to help out people who are searching for specific bits of advice.  In this particular case, someone had searched for "how to photograph at night".  Thus, I will mention my BEST advice for nighttime / low-light photography:  My advice to anyone wanting to photograph in near dark conditions, with only nighttime lighting (e.g. street lights, vehicle lights, etc.), is to use a tripod.  Nothing will mess with you more than unintentional movement of the camera during long exposures.  By ‘long exposures,’ I mean any shutter speed that is more than 1/15th second.  Maybe I’m not the steadiest shooter in the world, but I know that my heartbeat will certainly move the camera as blood pumps through my arms and hands.  Any movement during extended shutter times will create nice blurry photos.  A good, heavy, sturdy tripod will help create a steady platform for your camera.  So there you have it – Use a tripod is my BEST advice for nighttime and low-light photography.  My second best advice is experiment a lot.  My third best advice is shoot a lot.  My fourth best advice is try NOT to get hit by cars when taking photographs of traffic at nighttime.  I tend to set up shop in the street which has its own hazards.